Spirit Mountain

SPIRIT MOUNTAIN

 

“Said to be haunted”

“Source of strength and madness”

Alone on the night mountain

I wait, curious.

Screeches and groans

Tear the night, only I

Know they’re ravens

Not demons.

Harbour lights, town lights, wandering

Headlights shine and

Are gloved into mist

Pale flame of sunrise

Seascape afire

Ghosts? Then within us

But a trickle of

Welsh blood speaking:

Perhaps in the soil

Out of time, sleeping.

(This is the poem that got me writing poetry again. If I say it describes a night on Cader Idris, Welsh people will understand)

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6 Comments

  1. Happy to see that the experience and then the writing of a single poem, can evoke a will to explore and write poetry again. The experience of a night on a mountain is one well different from a night in ones own bed.

    Further to your comment on the recent ‘Waking winds – a Sun’s desires’ over my way, a couple of other poems similarly themed, but different are;
    ‘All up on the way’ and
    ‘Red Kites and Eagles’

    Reply
    • Thanks, Sean. I’ll look them up.

      I’ve found a few really excellent poets on the net, some unpublished, but I like your poetry best of all original material I’ve found.

      Reply
      • Thanks, Simon.

        Yes there are some quality original writers/poets out there, some of these creators of wordcraft are cutting well shaped and diverse niches, so sometimes I’ll find myself doing more reading/listening than writing.

      • Problem is, there’s so much – and I don’t enjoy reading poetry on the screen nearly as much as reading it in a book or hearing it spoken.

      • Yes, it is more for the ear to hear, and the voice to speak, than just as text on a page or screen to read.

      • I’m always very much aware that what I write in a poem should sound right and the sound of the words should contribute to the meaning, so even if it isn’t read aloud in truth, it should be read aloud in the mind. I believe poetry is at root an art of the spoken word, though we can imagine it spoken.

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